Saturday, October 1, 2011

Come and See Joshua Tree National Park with the Far Western Section of NAGT, November 11-13

(Cross-posted with minor edits from Teaching the Earth Sciences, the blog of the Far Western Section of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers)

Joshua Tree National Park is one of the most unique desert environments to be found anywhere in North America (See a representative journey with Geotripper here). Sitting astride the boundary zone between the Mojave and Sonoran deserts, the park displays a startling variety of plant and animal species, and stunning displays of a Proterozoic metamorphic complex and Mesozoic plutonic rocks. It is a great place to learn about geology.

Copper Mountain College will be the host for the Fall 2011 meeting, which will include explorations of the park, and a journey to the interior of the Mojave to see the scarps from the 1992 Landers earthquake, still starkly obvious after two decades. The magnitude 7.3 quake killed two and produced a fracture that crossed fifty miles of desert.

The Far Western Section of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers invites anyone interested in the geological sciences to join them, including students (especially students!). Membership in NAGT is not required. This is a wonderful opportunity to see a fascinating corner of California's geology, and a chance to meet earth science teachers from all over California and Nevada (Hawaii is in our section too). It is an exciting and economic way to see some of southern California's most incredible geology.

Friday November 11, 2011
6:00 PM Meet at Copper Mountain College Bell Center Community Room for Registration 
(On-site registration cost estimate is $50.)
7:00 PM NAGT Far Western Section Board Meeting
8:00 - 9:00 PM Registration
Saturday November 12, 2011
8:00 - 10:00 AM Meet at the Bell Center Community Room for Registration
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM Field Trips (Choose One)
Field Trip Number 1
Landers Earthquake: Scarps still visible after 20 years plus Pioneer Town: Dating of a Miocene(?) erosional surface – Bob Reynolds
Field Trip Number 2 
Geology of Joshua Tree National Park – Bruce Bridenbecker

Presentation: 6:00 – 9:00 PM Evening Social with Lecture on Mines and Mining in Joshua Tree National Park - Dee Trent
Sunday November 13, 2011
8:00 AM Meet at Bell Center Parking Lot for Field Trip to Desert Queen Mine – Dee Trent
Field Trip should conclude by 2:00 or 3:00 PM.                                           

Joshua Tree Area Services
For a directory of area motels and restaurants visit the Joshua Tree Chamber of Commerce Web Site at
Joshua Tree Area Camping
Indian Cove is located 13 miles east of Joshua Tree Village and 10 miles west of Twentynine Palms on the north side of the Wonderland of Rocks. Indian Cove Road dead-ends at this secluded area. Campers register at the ranger station located at the entrance to the Indian Cove area. Water is also available there.

Contact Bruce Bridenbecker for additional information.


Karen said...

What kind of mine was the Desert Queen?

Garry Hayes said...

It was a gold mine